What is most optimal way to use these intensity techniques?

HypertrophyCoach Joe Bennett Forums Training What is most optimal way to use these intensity techniques?

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  • #18671
    lukas vis
    Participant

    So question regarding intensity techniques like drop sets, super sets, rest pause and etc.

    My current thinking is that I’m always trying to preserve much strength early in the workout, and usually just place them on the back off sets of each compound,but I’m a little confused when it comes to isolation movements like shoulder raises or triceps extensions, because its a less intense exercise, why not just do all 3 sets each followed by a drop set or is it ever better idea to stick to straight sets? what about compounds?

    How do you place them, how often, how many and what is your reason behind it?

    #18692
    BryceBahm
    Participant

    Compound or not, excessive volume will absolutely take away from performance. Your best sets are the once where you are producing the most tension and lost force per rep. Of adding intensifiers takes away from that narrative then they may not be the best fit.

    #18702
    Joe
    Keymaster

    So question regarding intensity techniques like drop sets, super sets, rest pause and etc.

    My current thinking is that I’m always trying to preserve much strength early in the workout, and usually just place them on the back off sets of each compound,but I’m a little confused when it comes to isolation movements like shoulder raises or triceps extensions, because its a less intense exercise, why not just do all 3 sets each followed by a drop set or is it ever better idea to stick to straight sets? what about compounds?

    How do you place them, how often, how many and what is your reason behind it?

    You just need to think of “intensity techniques” as “more”. From there, it’s all individual. Like Bryce said, I wouldn’t do anything early in a session to take away potentially from the load you use, as arguably that is the biggest driver of force production. Fatigue and rep speed being the likely next two most important. Which you will capitalize on with intensity techniques. So your question is almost like asking, should I do 2 or 3 sets? Is more better? Just depends. Implement and measure the result. Most people just don’t keep all the variables consistent enough to know what’s doing what. (And I wouldn’t even worry about compound vs isolation movements – as no one really knows what they are talking about with “systemic fatigue”) But in general, if your making progress with just straight sets, don’t change anything. Or, if your recovery is a average to poor, don’t add in any. If your recovery is at a 10/10, you’re not growing, and you think you’re actually lacking training stimulus (after you address your form/intensity capabilities for one working set first), then yes, maybe add them in. See what changes they produce.

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